Memorial is integral to the Eucharist

Memorial is integral to the Eucharist. It is the sacramental memorial of Christ and His body.It cannot be understood without knowledge of Passover. The symbolism of both is deeply entwined. Both include remembrance, giving thanks, worship and renewing the covenant with god. Jesus instituted the Eucharist at the Last Supper. It added a new dimension to the Jewish mean, “in terms of what (or who) was celebrated”. Jesus asked his disciples to “do this in memory of me” (1 Cor 11:24) it is not merely a memorial recalling past covenants and sacrifices, but central to. The Church, acting powerfully in the present and opening towards the future. Denis Edwards says we often forget “that Eucharist had a thanks giving memorial for God at work in creation as well as in redemption.” However, it is not only looking backwards in remembrance but also looking forward in anticipation. “For whenever you eat this bread and drink this cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes.” (1 Corinthians 11:26) Anticipation is further seen in the “Marriage Supper of the Lamb” ( Revelation 19:9) and in the writings of Theodore of Mopsuestia (c. 350-428) who talks of sacraments as a foretaste of heaven.