2

2.3
Review the extent to which systems and processes promote individual wellbeing.

Self-acceptance
– The way in which we view our own lives and ourselves is a major source of well-being. If we are satisfied with who we are, and can live with our past experiences without bitterness or regret, then we can have contentment with our current situation. Self-acceptance is about coming to terms with what we can’t change or control and so often we meet people who are unable to do this. This may lead them into undertaking therapy to make the change or they may simply continue along the same path not realising the potential for change.

Positive relations with others
– Loving relationships and friendships where care and trust are apparent are so important to all of us and yet there may be a tendency to forget this in the workplace. Just as we value closeness and support of others, so too will our clients, but this can be neglected when we merely attend to physical needs. The need to be able to connect to others and have the opportunity to make friendships is just as important in long-term care as it is to us who can return home to our families each night

Autonomy
– We all value our independence and can possibly remember how it felt to be truly free of certain constraints when we were younger. Being free to make choices and our own decisions is a liberating time in our lives. Being in control of our own destiny is what autonomy refers to. Yet when a person goes into a care home or is ill for a long period of time, it is sometimes this aspect of their lives that is taken from them and often because care workers think is the right thing to do. As unique people with our own identity, values and goals in life, we need to be able to maintain the ability to think and act for ourselves and this is part of care work, to empower our clients to do the same.